August 30, 2018

Land Arts of the American West 2018 is gardening and gearing up!






Land Arts of the American West 2018

Land Arts of the American West at the University of New Mexico is preparing for another incredible fall program with our Art & Ecology students, visiting artists, activists, and community members, at sites across New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona. We will also be engaged in several collaborative projects along the way.

You can follow us throughout the fall via our blog, facebook, and instagram posts. You can find these here. Be sure to sign up for updates.


Here is a quick preview of what’s to come.

Collaborative Projects
A Garden TBA at the Albuquerque Museum of Art & History
A Garden TBA is a collaborative garden intervention in conjunction with SeedBroadcast Seed the Resilience: agri-Culture and Climate Change at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History. This project brings together visiting artist Christine Mackey, local farmers Tiana Baca and Sarah Montgomery, Land Arts of the American West, and Intermediate Art & Ecology Students to create a public earthwork on site at the museum. An accompanying symposium and performance will be held on December 6, 2018.

NeoRio Roots ~ Raices
Land Arts of the American West artists, along with visiting artist Francisco Letelier, will bring their innovative field-based creative research process to Rio Grande del Norte National Monument/Wild Rivers and the NeoRio annual outdoor contemporary art event to generate environmental installations for the public. Inspired by the theme, Roots ~ Raices, this group of artists will work both individually and collaboratively across creative disciplines of performance, time-based media, sculpture, and experimental art to explore a rooted sense of place. Artist will convene as a collective group a week before the event and camp on-site as they intimately explore the Rio Grande gorge. This embodied exploration will lead to a series of intuitive creative responses by these artists, presented as finished works of art to share with the public.

Resisting Extraction in the Greater Chaco Region
Grater Chaco community members and activists Daniel Tso, Mario Atencio, and Beata Tsosie-Peña will guide LAAW students through learning about environmental justice in indigenous communities and current oil and gas development in the Greater Chaco Region. Then visiting artist and fracking activist, Asha Canalos, will facilitate a project with LAAW to make the invisible, visible through a collaborative zine project.

Migration, Extinction, and Nature/Culture Dialogues in the US/Mexico Border Zone
Borderlands Restoration Network, along with visiting writer Francisco Cantú and artist Karima Walker will work with Land Arts of the American West students to investigate migration and extinction in the US/Mexico Border Zone through a creative study of bats, agave, and anthropogenic impacts, resulting in a creative time-based production.

2018 LAAW Exhibition
The annual 2018 Land Arts of the American West Exhibition will take place at UNM John Sommers Gallery and at off-site locations from December 3 – 13, 2018, along with a public reception on December 7.

Creative Bioregional Field Sites
Headwaters of the Rio Grande, SW Colorado
Muley Point, Bears Ears National Monument, Utah
Gila River and Wilderness, NM
White Sands, NM

LAAW Visiting Artists, Writers, Activists, Organizations, and Community Members:

Utah Diné Bikéyah

Land Arts of the American West
University of New Mexico
http://landarts.unm.edu
landarts@unm.edu

Land Arts of the American West: to inspire and support environmentally and socially engaged art practices through field-based bioregional teaching, collective learning, interdisciplinary research, community collaboration, and creative forms of publication and exhibition.


April 9, 2018

Who Are These Invisible Clouds



















Who are these invisible clouds
April 20, 2018
5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Santa Fe Art Institute
1600 St Michaels Dr
Santa Fe, NM 87505
sfai.org

This exhibition features work created in response to ongoing oil and gas extraction in the Greater Chaco Region and site-specific experiences shared among Daniel Tso, Sunny Dooley, and Land Arts of the American West and SFAI resident artists. Drawing on this time together, this one-night event presents works and performances that reveal connections between capitalism and extraction, while puncturing these with creative, alternative, disruptive, and kin-forming ideas, languages, and practices.

ARTISTS:
Adele Ardent
Viola Arduini
Jeanette Hart-Mann
Ryan Henel
Amy Catherine Hulshoff
Alex Kinney
Gil Ngolé
Ruby Pluhar
Paul Ross
Mikala Sterling

Free and open to the public

Many thanks to everyone who has made this possible through sharing their experiences, stories, contributing to this collective effort, and supporting the Land Arts of the American West program. Thank you Daniel Tso, Sunny Dooley, Asha Canalos, Jonah Yellowman, SFAI Resident Artists Gil Ngolé, Syrus Marcus Ware, Melisse Watson, Su-Ying Lee, Xenia Benivolski, Santa Fe Art Institute, Department of Art and College of Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico, and Lannan Foundation.

Land Arts of the American West: to inspire and support environmentally and
socially engaged art practices through field-based bioregional teaching, collective
learning, interdisciplinary research, community collaboration, and creative forms
of publication and exhibition.

For further information about Land Arts of the American West:
http://landarts.unm.edu
http://unmlandarts.blogspot.com
http://facebook.com/landartsunm
http://www.instagram.com/unmlandarts

Contact:
Jeanette Hart-Mann, Director, Land Arts of the American West
hartmann@unm.edu

November 28, 2017

Untitled

By Viola Arduini
White Sands National Monument
October 31, 2017

Adele told me to walk towards the two peaks on the right of the mountains. Just keep walking straight for a couple of miles and you'll find the cottonwoods, that's what she said. I walked, and walking allowed me to becoming aware of the landscape. My eyes to the peaks, trying to trace the straightest line my feet and the desert would allow me, avoiding plants, climbing dunes. On my way back to camp, I stepped on my own footprints. I played Sigur Ros music for most of the walk. I wanted to see if I could trick my brain and pretend I was in Iceland.



I eventually found the cottonwoods. The tiniest cottonwoods I saw in my life. Beautiful in their yellow shades on the white sands. Trees without a visible river.